Three Peaks travel guide – your perfect stay in the Sextner Dolomites

Aug 3, 2018

Photographed at the and surroundings

Kindly supported by the holiday region Three Peaks in the Sextner Dolomites.

Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima

The mighty, mighty Dolomites. When we grew up, those rugged mountains and lush green valleys have been some sort of a second home for us. No matter if the Austrian or Italian side, this area is where we went climbing, hiking, swimming, here we spent our school holidays together. The second ever vacation without our parents (the first one was a major letdown and therefore doesn’t really count, anyway) took us to Toblach and the memories made are for a lifetime. We felt free, lighthearted and above all completely carefree. We had pizza, paste, and perfect weather in that beautiful region, one or the other holiday crush and loads and loads of ice cream. It’s been at least ten summers, altogether that we spent in, around and top of the Dolomites. And even though we are now living in Iceland and not constantly seeking the wilderness of another country, anymore - we just last year paid one of our all-time fav’ places a week-long visit. We fell in love, all over again and decided it was about time to write a travel guide to the Three Sisters holiday region almost as extensive as our Iceland guide. With ten years of roaming those mountains under our belt, it’s written with all our knowledge and lifeblood. Therefore, and without further ado: our “Three Peaks Dolomites Travel Guide” including everything from preparation, hot to get there, accommodation and restaurants to must-sees, favorite hikes and all the beautiful lakes you simply have to visit.

1. Suggested trip length (and season) for an unforgettable stay.

Like ever so often, our answer to this very question would be: depends on what you want to do and see. We definitely recommend staying in the area for at least a week, since it’s not really a sightseeing destination but rather for real outdoor enthusiasts. So in order to enjoy a few hikes, bike tours, swims, climbs (and dinner experiences) you should plan a trip longer than just a weekend stay. Since we have always been traveling to the Dolomites during the summer, this guide is an explicit summer guide - which means May to September. If you wanna dine at one of all the amazing mountain huts (or even stay there) then your time to visit is the end of June to end of September. Most of the huts open mid of June as the snow usually tends to stick around that long (at least up in the mountains). So for mountaineering and trekking (and most of the other outdoor sports), your timeframe is limited. The other half of the year, the region turns into a paradise for skiers and snowboarders (December to April, to be exact)… but that would make for a complete guide itself (someday, friends).

what to do in the Dolomites in summer

Hike, Bike, adventure 

eat tyrolean cuisine

Stay in a mountain hut

2. What do I have to know and keep in mind before booking?

useful info to have at hand when traveling the Dolomites

Important phone numbers (in case of emergency)

For emergency calls (including police, ambulance, emergency doctor and fire brigade): 112

State police +39 0471 947611

Emergency Traffic information centre +39 0471 20 01 98
Hospital Bolzano (35-40 km) +39 0471 90 81 11
Pharmacy S. Cristina +39 0471 79 21 06
Pharmacy Selva +39 0471 79 51 42 

Emergency medical service - Nives square in Selva Tel. +39 0471 794266,

Dolomiti Sportclinic - Purger street 181 Ortisei Tel. +39 0471 086000

The area code is +39

Link-list (websites with important information)
Some information about flora and fauna

The wildlife in the Dolomites / South Tyrolean region is rich. Squirrels, badgers, martens, ermines, and hares - which all belong to the weasel family - can be spotted in the mountains. There are over 115 species of birds to be found (among them owls like the super cute and often tiny pygmy owl), the most majestic certainly is the golden eagle. Deer, chamois, ibex, mouflon, and lynx roam the area and well, then there's the brown bear, of course.

The fauna might be even more impressive with all the variety (1,400 types of plant life) the region has to offer. Above all might very well stand the rare "Edelweiß" but there are other flowers, that stand out as incredibly unique, as well. We won't bore you with the Latin names and very details but look out for purple plants (looking like bellflowers) blossoming on rocks and in cracks on an altitude of 2000 meters. Or the tiny yellow blossoms that grow on an altitude of even 3000 meters. You will experience the Dolomites as a colorful and blossoming paradise of plants.

 

The Three Peaks region is incredibly busy during the summer months so you should plan your trip well in advance. Since the timeframe for hiking is narrowed down to three months backpackers and mountain lovers flood the Dolomites. In order to rent a car and book a room at one of all the magnificent stays (or as mentioned before, one of the mountain huts) you should start booking early.

The currency in the Dolomites is Euro (both in Italy and Austria), the language either Italian and German (though people in the area tend to speak both). There are secluded valleys where the locals speak a very own language called ‘Ladin’, which derived from Latin and can be understood by neither Italians nor Germans.

The Dolomites are vast, include at least 18 major peaks and several very charming mountain villages where the inhabitants sell amazing food from local and seasonal ingredients, handmade woodcarvings and way more. Even though it can get quite busy - compared to the rest of Italy the Dolomites are still remote and crowd-free.

Since tourism attracts mainly outdoor sports fans almost, every town has an incredibly well-equipped gear store. Seriously, we bought at least two pairs of our hiking boots in some rather secluded town in the Dolomites!

Despite being tucked away in the mountains, most villages have small health centers where you can get help and treatment in case of an emergency. Same goes for pharmacies so no worries if you forgot Aspirin. We would still strongly recommend a travel insurance since the mountains are, well… the mountains. The unexpected can happen and a rescue team can cost you a fortune. So whatever company you chose for insurance - make sure off the beaten path adventures are covered and all rescue, medical and repatriation cost included.

Wild camping is strictly prohibited in either Austria and Italy. There is an exception for a one night bivvy but that only applies to National Parks in Austria. Since the Dolomites are a UNESCO world heritage we would absolutely not risk to wild camp there and get caught! Rather opt for one of all the incredibly beautiful campsites we will introduce to you!

Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima

3. How do I best travel to the Sextner Dolomites?

Getting to the Dolomites is fairly easy. When visiting from neighboring countries and you don't mind a long drive than taking the car is a good choice. If you are visiting from abroad then there are countless airports you can consider. Renting a car in Munich and driving the last 330 km would be a great solution since the roads are very scenic and you will need a car, anyways. Other than that, there is Venice, 190 km away, if you want to combine your stay with some busy city sight-seeing. Or the beautiful Austrian town Innsbruck, 130 km away. Closer than that would only be Bozen with 100 km of distance to cover. Even though there are loads of trains connecting all the previously mentioned airports to the Sextner Dolomites we would absolutely advise to rent a car in order to be truly mobile.

4. Accommodation (Recommendations for hotels, mountain huts & camping.)

One of the most important choices will be the one of where to stay. Do you seek luxurious hotels, affordable eco-friendly accommodation, campgrounds or mountain huts? No matter your desire - you can find it all in the Dolomites. Since we’ve by now stayed in several places, we will suggest those we’ve been especially pleased with a bit more in detail. For an overview of all available hotels and bed & breakfasts of the Three Peaks region check out this site.

If you plan a trip to an area like the Dolomites, chances are really high that you are an absolute mountain lover. So what better place to stay at than a mountain hut up on 2000 meters of altitude, right? Each one is connected to trails so you can plan your route from hut to hut and bring almost nothing but your sleeping bag.

There is a huge difference between the so-called "Alm", "Refugio", "Hütte" and a traditional "Schutzhaus". The latter only provides shelter, no cooking or bath facilities (let alone a restaurant). If you want to stay in a hut during summer - they only open in summer and for around three months - then make sure to book your stay way ahead. It gets busy up there and you don't want to make the mistake to arrive at a fully booked Refugio in a rainy night. The huts vary a lot in comfort, some have amazing bath facilities, private rooms and breakfast and dinner included in your stay, others are dorms, cold water, and a stove for you to use. The views are always breathtaking, though. Plus, you fall asleep and wake up to the most magical light and might even witness the famous "Alpenglow".

overview over all suggested accommodation
Affordable Stays
Luxury hotels in the region
Mountain Huts
Campgrounds
Affordable Stays

Joas natur hotel B&B ****

Joas is a cozy, sustainable, eco-friendly Bed & Breakfast, located in the very charming little village of “Vierschach”, close to “Innichen” and is situated hillsides. It’s been built following very strict guidelines on being environmentally friendly, non-toxic, pollution-free and building-biology valuable. No waste of electricity, a very healthy, regional, seasonal and sustainable breakfast with jam and juice from the owner’s organic farm. Apart from hotel rooms and suites they also rent out apartments - which makes a lot of sense if you plan on staying for more than just a few nights. The Joas hotel also comes with an amazing spa which offers an incredible view over the Dolomites. There is a ropeway right next to the house which means in winter the ski slopes are DIRECTLY in front of your door. A lot of hiking paths start in the area, one to the peak of the “Helm”, for example. It’s a modern, stylish, sustainable and conveniently located accommodation and therefore our top suggestion for when it comes to more affordable stays. (go to website

Maria Mairhofer / Unterstein (close to Niederdorf) 

The organic farm “Unterstein” is an amazing adventure - one we personally intend to repeat. Such a beautiful accommodation tucked away in the mountain and THE tip if you are looking for something that is rare to find these days: utter peace and quiet. Th remote farmhouse only comes with four rooms, no TV, polished floorboards (so you walk around in sock or bare feet in the entire house, even for breakfast and dinner <3) and a big swimming pond in the yard. Quite some books and even an opera have been written here by guests - it's a place to be inspired, to switch off, unwind and flee everyday life. Owner Maria is holding classes on the art of healing (with herbs), nutrition (plant based) and natural cosmetics. The prices for the rooms don't vary throughout the year since the philosophy is that rooms and food always have the same worth and should therefore not differ because of high and low season. It's a place to come with bikini and books, hiking gear and rain jacket but without Cellphone and laptop.


If you are interested in farm holidays, you should check the website "Roter Hahn" (the "Unterstein" is listed with them, as well). They have around 1,5k farms participating in South Tyrol which you can contact and request for a stay. Definitely worth a look! // If you are looking for an overview of all hotels in South Tyrol, this is it: https://www.dolomiti.it/en/hotels/ (Find exactly what you are looking for right here by checking your desired hotel class and region.)

Luxury hotels in the region

Grandhotel "Pragser Wildsee"***

This beautiful, family-run, landmarked, historical Grandhotel, built 1899, is situated directly at the water of the Dolomites most favorite lake. It's hardly been changed since back in the day and in the rooms, you find lots of the original furniture - a true dream come true. They offer Mediterranean food and even if you don't intend to spend the night you could at least garnish your visit to magical "Lago Di Braies" with a nice lunch or delicious dinner overlooking the turquoise water. (go to website) Even though it only has three stars we still consider it higher class due to the view, the quite expensive meals, and the vintage interior. 

Four to five-star hotels

In the very area of the Sextner Dolomites, you can choose from only four **** (+) hotels (Bad Moos Dolomites Spa Resort, Vitalpina Berghotel Sexten, Hotel Dolomitenhof & Chalte Alte Post, Family Resort Rainer - find all four of them here), entire South Tyrol and Trentino offer lots and lots of high-class accommodation, though. 

Closest by (Three Peaks region) *****

Mountain Huts

Rifugio Fanes

A great-value stay is the “Rifugio Fanes”, a family-run mountain hut built back in 1928 offering charming and rustic rooms to all outdoor enthusiasts. It’s located a tad more than 2.000m high up in the Dolomites so as you can imagine, the scenery is simply jaw-dropping. Around 70 beds are free for booking during the summer months (beginning of June to mid-October) and then again for skiing season (right after Christmas to mid-April). They are well-known for their awesome breakfast, lunch, and dinner. (go to website)

The most famous mountain huts in the area of the Three Peaks

"Dreizinnenhütte" (2405 meters) directly facing the peaks, restaurant with traditional dishes, on the famous loop trail around the Three Peaks, VERY busy. "Rifugio Lavaredo", also on said loop trail, amazing locating with a breathtaking view, food is ok but nothing special. "Rifugio Auronzo" situated on the loop trail, as well. One of the few huts you can actually drive to. It's quite huge with 25 rooms. "Büllelejochhütte" is a highly remote hut with stunning views, a sweet staff, and incredibly good food. It does not come with showers and single rooms, though. There are way more huts in the entire area and you can plan your trip and trek along beautiful stays, great food, and incredible sceneries. You can find an overview of all mountain huts (food & accommodation) in the area on this website.


Make sure to bring cash since there is no way to pay by card up there. 

Campgrounds

Camping Olympia

Close to Toblach, there is a 4-star eco-camping (solar panels, pellet heating system) site called "Camping Olympia" which is not just beautifully located but also ridiculously well equipped. 200 spaces, alpine lodges for rent, modern facilities, shops, bars, a garden, a Kneipp path and two restaurants on 5 hectares of land make this a perfect stay in a perfect location. (go to website) 

Toblacher See Camping

If you are looking for a smaller, more 'peace and quiet' kinda site then you might be interested in the "Toblacher See Camping" - a campground directly at the Toblacher Lake. The dog-friendly eco-camping has nice facilities and free wifi. You can order and pick up food at the close by restaurant "Seeschupfe" if you should find yourself craving some really good food. (go to website

Caravan Park Sexten

Then there is the absolutely incredible 4-star "Caravan Park Sexten" that comes not just with loads of space for camping (and glamping) but chalets, lodges and even treehouses(!!!) to rent, as well. Modern bath facilities, three restaurants, and a perfect spa complete this amazingly located campsite. It's considered one of the ten best camping parks in all over Europe. (go to website) 


Like we mentioned right in the beginning of this guide, wild camping is strictly prohibited.

Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima

5. Restaurant Recommendations and mountain huts to dine at.

If you don’t gain a few pounds while vacationing in the Dolomites you’re doing something wrong - no matter how much you work out, the food is just THAT good. Every single holiday we’ve rolled ourselves into bed at night and just could never get enough of all that traditional yumminess. Dumplings (especially the ones filled with cheese), Schlutzkrapfen (Pasta), perfect Italian pizza, Palatschinken (sweet pancakes) and gelato as far as the eye can see should make every true lover of cuisine deeply happy. We feel like we’ve tested every single restaurant available in the area by now and want to give some insight into those places you most definitely should visit.

Helm Hotel Pizzeria

The "Helm" hotel traditional Tyrolean restaurant is incredibly rustic and incredibly good so during our last trip to the Dolomites, we found ourselves at that very Pizzeria three (!) times in a row. Our husbands just loved the stone-oven baked "Diabolo" and had to get one, again and again. We personally preferred the Dumplings (they come garnished with butter and parmesan) and the "Apfelstrudel" but apart from the food, it's the atmosphere and awesome decor that makes the place so special. It's an old house, the floors are squeaking, in the sunroom is find a massive fireplace. Cozy pillows and blankets, rustic wooden barrels and candlelight complete the quaint place. The prizes are ok, the restaurant is open daily from 12 am - 2 pm for lunch and from 5 pm - 12 pm for dinner. It's great food in an amazing atmosphere and we can truly recommend the pizza, pasta, dumplings, and desserts.

Maria Mairhofer/Unterstein

At this previously mentioned place, you will get served one of the most unique dinners possible. Most of the ingredients served are grown directly on the organic farm and hand-picked and processed by the family. Besides the beautiful house overlooking the Dolomites, the family owns several meadows and fields in the valley, as well. Maria (the owner) loves animals and doesn’t serve any meat so her dishes are all vegetarian, mostly even vegan. The dinner we had at “Unterstein” was nothing short of perfect. Fresh hand-picked salad with home-made cream cheese, then the main course of beetroot dumplings, fried elderflower and homemade rhubarb compote for dessert. The beer came from a local organic brewery and the lemonade Maria made out of handpicked herbs and flowers (SO GOOD!). There are only four tables at “Unterstein”, a fireplace and some rocking chairs.

Michelin starred Tilia

It's a one of a kind experience to have dinner at chef Chris Oberhammer's Tilia in Toblach. Not just because of the indeed excellent food, the great selection of wines and the charming and highly professional service but also because of the amazing atmosphere. A small glass house right in the middle of a field of wildflowers, they only have three tables on the terrace and five inside. The guests are seated on comfy armchairs, the music is subdued and by Ludovico Einaudi -  filling the room with even more magic. The view of the mountains is incredible, the food even more so. Our personal highlights have been the truffles risotto and the dessert - chocolate praliné with chocolate ice cream so rich in taste it has no equal. Of course, such an experience comes with quite some money but even though our credit cards were silently crying we didn't regret a single cent.

Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Mountain huts you can deliciously dine at:

It's a stark contrast to previously introduced "Tilia" but there are a few places up in the mountains that we wholeheartedly recommend for a savory lunch! Following this link, you will find an overview of all mountain huts and "Almen" in the Sextner Dolomites, incl. opening hours. The page is a good tip for all those who would like to indulge in a piece of cake or a nice portion of dumplings after an exhausting hike. We especially liked the "Alpe-Nemes" hut since it is a nice walk up there, a beautiful view and really good food. Another recommendation would be to order a "Brettljause" (a huge platter of cheeses, ham, veggies and more with some butter and bread) at the "Plätzwiese". Other personal tips are the "Obstanserseehütte" and the "Bonnerhütte" as both offer a great view and local, seasonal food. (To be fair though, we visited a lot of huts in the area and have not once been disappointed with the food.) Last but not least you might wanna check out the "Langealm" (Three Peaks area) from which you can see the three majestic mountains and where everything is homemade.

6. Sight-seeing: lakes, villages, abandoned places and more

We don’t know about you but we just LOVE mountain lakes. Turquoise water so crystal clear that you feel as if you would spacewalk surrounded by massive peaks. The Sextner Dolomites and Three Peaks region offers several of those lakes. The well-known “Pragser Wildsee” (also known by its Italian name “Lago di Braies”), the “Toblacher See” and the three lakes up in the valley of the Three Peaks. Spending a holiday in the area doesn’t necessarily mean hiking, only, you can also go for a swim, row, kayak or just chill in the sun. Mix up your mountain adventures with a plunge into the cold, a picnic on the lush green grass, amazing dinners and a little sightseeing.

Dolomites incredible mountain lakes.
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Pragser Wildsee (Lago di Braies)
Sorapissee (Lago di Sorapiss)
Toblacher See (Lago di Dobbiaco)
Dürrensee (Lago di Landro)
Pragser Wildsee (Lago di Braies)

The most famous lake ( also known as the "pearl of the Dolomites") of the entire region is located in the nature park “Sennes-Fanes-Prags” and has been the set of quite a few movies and series by now. It’s also one of the Outdoor and Nature Photography Instagramer’s favorite subject. Unfortunately, that led through an incredible increase in tourist over the past two years which means the admittedly ridiculously beautiful lake is just as ridiculously crowded in summer. If you want to enjoy the view of the emerald water and the surrounding peaks without the masses then you either have to there up like 7am early (which we’d highly suggest since you might be lucky and witness the perfect reflection of the scenery in the still water) or at least walk around the lake and to a less crowded spot (it’s four kilometres in total and takes you an hour, tops). If you walk away from the main waterside and the boat rental then the crowd’s gonna clear up a little. The Pragser Wildsee is a starting point to several hikes (one of them being a famous and beautiful long-distance trek). You have to wait in line quite a bit if you wanna go for a spin on one of the nostalgic wooden boats - especially on a clear summer day. It’s a dream location for weddings - we saw a bride and groom on the water while we waited for our turn. You are allowed to swim in the lake - due to its altitude the water is extremely cold, though, all year round.

Sorapissee (Lago di Sorapiss)

The "Lago di Sorapiss" (Sorapissee in German) is an absolute gem - one you should definitely consider visiting. For a moment you will find yourself asking how you suddenly ended up in Canada since the turquoise lake surrounded by massive peaks looks somewhat like the little brother of famous Moraine or Emerald Lake. It's a bit further away from the Three Peaks area than the other three lakes but absolutely (!!) worth the trip. You can only reach it by foot, the hike up Trail 215 takes around 1.5 - 2 hours and is partly very steep (especially the second half of the hike). Ropes and stairs make it a tad more comfortable but suitable shoes and a bit of experience are an absolute must. Close by there's a mountain hut named Rifugio Vandelli where you can sit down for a bite if you get hungry. It's a rustic cabin and the food is simple but filling.

Toblacher See (Lago di Dobbiaco)

We mentioned our first holiday without parents which we spent in the region - one of the day trips we went on back then was hiking to and around this very lake. We still remember how extremely hot and dry it was that day, even flip-flops, shorts and ice cream didn’t help. Caro got a mean nose bleed and yet, we fell in love with that lake. The deep greenish blue, the scenery, the ice-cold water (why didn’t we bring a bikini that day?). You can swim in the “Toblacher See” as well but just like with all the other lakes higher up in the mountains - it’s only for the hard-boiled. 😛 You can explore the lake by boat, as well (even though it’s not the nostalgic wooden ones). If you want to walk around it then estimate roughly two hours. In the lakeside restaurant, you can order an ice cold apple juice with matching “Apfelstrudel” if you get hungry. Of course, the lake is a starting point to several hikes, as well be it the peak of the “Sarlkofel”, the “Monte Piano”, the “Plätzewiese” we mentioned before or the “Bonner” mountain hut which Linda’s parents are raving about since years. There you are supposed to have an amazing view all over the Dolomites and the food is equally awesome, we’ve been told. The “Toblacher See” comes with a lot of history - around the water’s edge, there are five abandoned bunkers built by Mussolini in the year 1939.

Dürrensee (Lago di Landro)

Last but not least there also is the “Dürrensee” which is located a few kilometers behind the “Toblacher See” and perfect for a dip since it doesn’t have a runoff and therefore heats up way faster than the other two. On the northern bank, there’s a pebble beach where you can sunbathe and relax, there’s more than enough parking spaced and of course, the view is amazing. You see the so-called “Cristallo” group and those rugged peaks against the turquoise water are a sight for sore eyes. On the other side of the road, you’ll find a climbing garden and a restaurant called “Dürrensee” which is supposed to be really nice - we personally have not tried it, though. Walking around the lake is no big tour but a there’s a lot of hikes starting from there, as well. You can climb up the Monte Piano, walk along an old military ropeway and an abandoned military graveyard. We personally suggest the “Dürrensee” for bathing since it isn’t that cold and located BEHIND the way more touristy “Toblacher See”. Smaller crowds, warmer water - it’s a place to relax and unwind, with an incredible view on top of it.

Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Cities and Culture.

Next to all the hiking and biking, the climbing, rowing, and swimming, next to all the beautiful lakes, mountain huts, and delicious food there is also the small towns in between. In the bigger villages of the Dolomites (Toblach, Innichen, Sexten, and Niederdorf) you will not just find amazingly well-equipped sports gear stores (the most impressive one is located in Innichen at the town square) but wine stores, cheeseries, flower- and antique stores, as well. You can browse through handmade goods and shop for some amazing food to bring back home. Especially worth mentioning is the Alpa Pragas store - a fruit manufactory - where incredible marmalade is being produced. If you go then don't just try the regular ones (even though the raspberry one is heavenly) but also the more unusual variety, like "Apfelstrudel".

The area is also culturally rich. A lot of old buildings, beautifully preserved. Like the pastel church in Toblach, built in a Roman, Gothic architectural style and incredibly kitschy with chandeliers, ceiling fresco, tons of gold and lavish wood carvings. When on a hike you will most like come across one of all the tiny churches that are located in most of the valleys, meadows, and forests.

World War I Trails and Tunnels

Like already mentioned some time during this guide, you will come across quite a few remains from World War 1. Trenches, tunnels, trails, and bunkers can be found all over the place. If you are a sucker for all things abandoned (like we are) and/or a history nerd then you're in for a treat.

It certainly is a dark history, nothing to be excited about, yet deeply fascinating. There are bullet holes in lots of the trees, stone fortresses hidden away in the rugged mountains, over 50 tunnels, tombstones. If you are especially interested in walking the tunnel system then take the approx. one hour drive to Lagazoui where you find an entire system you can climb, including caverns and gun posts, mixed up with incredible views.

Abandoned Places in the Area

6. Hikes, bike trips, and other (outdoor) sports

No matter if you want to go for a hike, trek, bike trip, paraglide, raft or climb - every outdoor lover and adrenaline junkie will get their money's worth during a summer in the Sextner Dolomites. Of course, the area first and foremost is known for the mighty Three Peaks. But there’s more to it than the several fantastic hikes around the gigantic massif - the ‘Sextner Sonnenuhr’, the "Fischleintal" valley and the Cadini group, for example, are offering loads of gorgeous paths. No matter if high route, "via ferrata" or hikes suitable for families - the area has it all.

Here are a few numbers to give you a better idea: 182km of hiking paths in the region of Sexten and 662km at the Three Peaks part of the Dolomites. In the entire Dolomites, there are over 2.500 hikes, including more than 170 long distance treks.   ...   That is a lot of hiking, dear friends.

You can get a pretty good overview for the Sextner Dolomites right here:

There are equally many possibilities to go biking. The "Drauradweg" (approx. 50km) is a beautiful, easy trail to bike and connects Toblach to the small town Lienz (a beautiful place with amazing ice cream!) and can be extended by cycling around the "Toblachersee". There are so many possibilities and skill levels, from easy breezy beginner tours to super advanced 4-peaks-and-3,500m-altitude-differential expert levels. Whatever you seek, you will find it - cycling, mountain biking, e-bikes, you name it. Get an overview of all the trails right here.

This is just a teeny tiny glimpse into the world of activities in a summer in the Dolomites. If you want to know more about climbing possibilities (there's many) then this is your link. If you seek an adventure and want to try something else, then maybe paragliding, 'crazy golf', a flight in a hot air balloon, the high wire park or a toboggan run in a fun bob are just what you are looking for.

During our last stay in the area and the beautiful village "Vierschach" we went on three different little adventures, one being the rather breathtaking but a tad more exhausting ascend to the "Three Peaks", the rather relaxed hike “Plätzwiese - Strudelkopf” and an easy breezy beautiful walk for lunch at the “Alpe-Nemes” hut. We can absolutely recommend all three of these routes, especially since you can easily extend them to your liking. Like adding a peak to the ‘Three Peaks’ viewpoint and turn the advanced three-hour hike up there into a ten-hour+ adventure including a night in a hut. (For example by hiking the loop trail around the Peaks and then head to beautifully located "Büllelejochhütte" where you can also stay the night like we already mentioned (and suggested). If you take trail 101 from the "Dreizinnenhütte" then you are in for breathtaking views over lakes, mountains, and trees. From the hut the ascend to the "Oberbachernspitze" is about 30/45mins.

You can also choose the longer and more difficult ascend to the “Dürrenstein” instead of the “Strudelkop” if you start at the beautiful “Plätzwiese” (but there are even more peaks surrounding the valley, waiting to be conquered). At the “Alpe-Nemes” mountain hut you can also keep hiking and explore the gigantic area surrounding it.

So no matter if you are a pro climber, passionate mountaineer or a beginner - you can easily find suitable paths for yourself. Families wanting to get some fresh air and breathtaking views are just as much in for a treat as those craving a relaxed walk and some great lunch with a view. There is enough paths, peaks, climbs, biking routes and more for absolutely everyone in love with the mountains.

If you are looking for guided tours then the South Tyrol Balance, which is offered every spring, might just be what you are looking for. We intended to join in on a sunrise hike for a tour to Toblach’s “Pfannhorn” peak. A hike starting at moonlight and with headlamps, guided by a professional mountaineer, where you arrive at the peak during dusk. Afterward, there would be a healthy breakfast on one of the mountain huts. We really were so looking forward to it since the view during a golden sunrise must be absolutely incredible. But Caro had a massive cold (which conveniently started on the first day of our vacation, woohoo!) and Linda got footsore in her new shoes the day before while hiking the Three Peaks. There was no way we would have gotten up at two in the morning for another 3-4 hours ascend so we had to cancel. We still wanted to suggest it since it’s one of those trips you won’t forget.

Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima

8. The magical Three Peaks - trails to go, gear to bring

They are famous, they are massive, they are all over Instagram and in general, a photo motive every outdoor photographer wants to capture. For good reason, the "Tre Cime di Lavaredo" like the Italians call them are impressively beautiful. There are several ways up to the viewpoint - the best one (at least in our humble opinion) is the classical ascend from the "Fischleintal" and the "Talschlusshütte" to the viewpoint at the "Drei Zinnen Hütte". It's a nice hike, steep in parts, with gorgeous views and can be extended to your personal liking. We already mentioned the "Büllelejochhütte" and "Oberbachernspitze" in the last chapter.

If you're not much of a hiker then you can just drive up to the "Rifugio Auronzo" and walk from there. If you want to extend that walk at least a little then you can choose between Trail 101 to "Rifugio Lavaredo" or Trail 105 to "Langealm" - both previously mentioned in this guide. The drive costs €25 mountain toll. The entire loop trail around the Three Peaks takes approx. 4 hours.

The Hike

Sexten Fischleintal - Drei Zinnen Hütte 
| Trail: Nr. 102 
| Length: ca. 14 km | Duration: ca. 5-6 hours altogether 
| Ascend: ca. 960 meters in height | You can park at the "Fischleintal" (costs €5 for a day)

The Gear

It's not a super difficult hike but we would still label it as 'advanced'. No climbing, no ice, yet you should definitely wear suitable hiking boots and some proper clothes, as well. A hardshell, rain and windproof jacket (the weather tends to be on the more unpredictable site) and a long-sleeve (the wind can feel quite chilly once you are up at the plateau) are a must. Bring enough water and some protein bars if you don't wanna stop in at the "Drei Zinnen Hütte". If you extend your hike then definitely pack sandwiches, as well.

And this is where our guide comes to an end. If you wanna stay on top of new articles and mini guides then make sure to subscribe to our newsletter, where we send out an overview of all newly released articles once a month and tend to add one or the other free goodie. Thanks for reading, we hope you found what you were looking for! (And thanks a ton for sharing this piece of content with whomever it might be helpful for)!

Please enter your name.
Please enter a valid email address.
Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.

Takk fyrir and bless bless! <3

Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima

Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima
Three Peaks Travel Guide, Sextner Dolomites Travel guide, All you need to know when traveling the Dolomites, best hikes Three Peaks Dolomites, Dolomites Hiking Guide, Free Three Peaks Travel Guide, planning a trip to the Dolomites, Outdoor adventure Dolomites, Outdoor website for women, Dear Heima

Follow on: Bloglovin - Facebook - Instagram - Pinterest

DISCLAIMER: All items/clothes marked with an asterisk (*) are sponsored. This article might furthermore contain affiliate links. We may therefore receive commissions for purchases made through said links. Nevertheless, all tips and products shown and linked to are things we highly recommend. We will never put anything on Like A Riot that we haven’t verified and/or personally used. All paid posts are furthermore clearly marked as such.

Happiness is only real when shared

Nelson Travel Itinerary, Nelson BC Travel Guide, Nelson British Columbia Travel Guide, Nelson 48h Summer Itinerary, Nelson Kootenay Rockies Itinerary, Outdoor Activities Nelson BC, British Columbia Travel Guide, Dear Heima, Outdoor Blog for Women

Nelson Travel Itinerary – how to spend a perfect day (and night) in Nelson, BC

Iceland on a budget, Iceland Blog, Iceland insider tips, insider tips on how to save money in Iceland, guide to saving money when traveling Iceland, saving money in Iceland, cheap trip to Iceland, Iceland for cheap, how to stay on a budget in Iceland, Outdoor magazine for women, Iceland for women, Dear Heima

Iceland on a budget – 8 insider tips on saving serious money

Iceland Travel Guide, Iceland Blog, Iceland insider tips, extensive Iceland Travel Guide, all you need to know to travel Iceland, free Iceland travel guide, free Iceland travel e-book, best Iceland Travel Guide, most comprehensive Iceland Travel Guide, Iceland Travel Guide and Hacks, what do I need to know when traveling Iceland, Dear Heima, Outdoor Website for Women

The most comprehensive Iceland travel guide you can possibly find.

Leave a Comment





Dear Heima

Dear Heima